Yasmin Sewell: President Of Style

Yasmin Sewell has the best job title. Ever.

As Vice President of Style and Creative at e-commerce trailblazer Farfetch, the Australian native has found the perfect synergy for her finely-tuned industry prowess, spanning buying, retail consultancy and trend forecasting.

But this is far from the first time Yasmin’s calm yet confident charm and whip-smart business acumen have put her at the helm of a super-charged brand with big influence.

Her impressive 20-year career is glittered with some of the most coveted names in the business – Browns, Liberty London and Style.com to list a mere few.

This season, experimentation is the name of the game, and who better than Yasmin to act as muse for Westfield’s spring/summer 2017 campaign.

We sat down with the queen of change to talk trends, new beginnings and the resurgence of the ’80s.

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Pictured above: Balenciaga Dress, Stuart Weitzman Tie model Boots, Gucci Bag

Westfield: What is your involvement with Westfield?

Yasmin Sewell: I’m Westfield’s style muse for spring. I love to experiment with fashion and Westfield brought me back to talk about fashion experimentation and the big new trends for spring.

W: What does experimentation mean to you?

YS: Fashion is constantly changing. Experimenting with the new trends and new designers keeps me interested, moving forward and feeling young. It’s also about personal evolution and using fashion to channel different facets of my personality.

W: You constantly push the boundaries of your own style. How do you continue to do so?

YS: First and foremost, I’m inspired by great design. I fall in love with a new designer or with a particular piece and evolve my look around that. So my style changes and evolves depending on which designer or pieces I happen to be in love with at a particular time. Right now, I’m in love with white boots. White boots make everything look good! And big earrings. Since I cut my hair, I wear them everyday with everything!

W: Have you ever had a preconception about a particular trend? How did you overcome it?

YS: Never thought the ’80s would come back again and feel so right – it’s not going anywhere, that one.

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Pictured above: Aje Dress, Ksubi Jeans from General Pants, Zara Robe, Salvatore Ferragamo Bag, Zara Shoes, Gucci Earrings

W: What is the easiest way for shoppers to experiment with their style this season?

YS: Find one great piece that you love and make it all about that. It might be that you build your wardrobe from a longline floral dress. Experiment by wearing skinny trousers underneath with a knife point stiletto, or change the look completely by wearing it with one of the new mule-style shoes. And seek advice from experts. Talk to the sales assistants in your favourite stores or make an appointment to see a Westfield stylist, who will be able to curate from all the many stores in the Westfield centre.

W: What should we look out for this spring/summer?

YS:

Pink! Every woman looks good in it. Contrast it with prints and florals and, best of all, wear it with red.

Prints, wear clashing prints all at the same time. You might think it’s wrong but it’s so right. Just look at GUCCI.

Pyjama dressing has been with us for several seasons, but now it’s also about the robe. Wear it like a jacket over jeans and long dresses.

Oversize is the trend I’m most into right now. Try it in a blazer, a coat, a shirt, a jean, a sleeve. Suddenly narrow doesn’t feel right anymore.

W: Which Australian designers do you think are pushing the boundaries this season?

YS: Kym Ellery does the oversize trend brilliantly. I wore an oversized houndstooth jacket from Zimmermann in the shoot I did for Westfield that was very cool.

Also Dion Lee. I’m wearing a beautiful longline black dress with fine net insets at the neck that makes me feel super feminine. It’s a nice balance to the man-style coat.

W: How do you describe your style?

YS: I get asked this all the time and it’s a hard question to answer. I would say that I wear different things that represent the mood I’m in daily, whatever feeling that is. Having said that, as a person, I never want to feel stagnant, which is why I am always willing to experiment, try new things and just have fun with fashion.

W: When you think of Australian style, what comes to mind?

YS: Beauty and body-con. Australian girls dress to enhance their inner sexiness… or quite often, outer sexiness!

W: Are there any up-and-coming Australian and NZ designers you have your eye on?

YS: Georgia Alice, Strateas Carlucci, Maggie Marilyn.

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Pictured above: Zimmerman Top, Scanlan Theodore Heels, Zara Earrings, Calvin Klein Jeans, Vintage Bulgari Watch, Agent Provocateur Bra

W: Where do you find fashion inspiration?

YS: My inspiration comes always from great design and great designers.

W: You’ve had a diverse and interesting career. What have been the highlights?

YS: There have been many highlights. The most fulfilling experiences have come when I’ve created something of my own with no formula. I opened my shop Yasmin Cho in London when I was only 21. I was as passionate about young, experimental designers as I am now and looking back I now realise that shop put me on the map. Another highlight was Beach in the East. My husband Kyle and I created a pop-up shop and built our own abandoned swimming pool in East London. Right now, I’m very excited about my new role at Farfetch where I am Vice President, Style and Creative.

W: Is style innate or can you learn it?

YS: Anyone can learn style. Understand which clothes make you feel a certain way. If you feel beautiful in a feminine dress, wear a feminine dress and radiate with confidence. And if you want to experiment, maybe wear the dress with a piece you wouldn’t have considered before – such as a pointed shoe or slightly more unusual jewellery.

W: What is your best piece of beauty advice?

YS: Both my parents were hairdressers, so I say never underestimate the power of a radical change to your hairstyle. In my early ’20s, I cropped my hair and changed my life.

Originally published on westfield.com.au